Raising Working Standards

Latest

A Reform Agenda for the U.S. Department of Transportation Report

A Reform Agenda for the U.S. Department of Transportation

The severe economic downturn caused by the coronavirus has created an urgent need to boost federal infrastructure spending and reform programs and policies to ensure they achieve the greatest social, economic, and environmental return on investment.

Kevin DeGood

Centering Equity in the Future-of-Work Conversation Is Critical for Women’s Progress Report

Centering Equity in the Future-of-Work Conversation Is Critical for Women’s Progress

Employers and policymakers must take concrete steps to avoid replicating and perpetuating longstanding racial, gender, and ethnic biases in workplaces of the future to create equitable environments where women have the best chance of success.

Jocelyn Frye

Workers’ Boards: A Brief Overview Fact Sheet
A dishwasher walks through the dining room at a restaurant in Washington, D.C., June 2016. (Getty/J. Lawler Duggan/The Washington Post)

Workers’ Boards: A Brief Overview

By developing policies for workers’ boards—governmental bodies that bring together representatives of workers, employers, and the public—state and local policymakers can raise minimum wage rates, benefits, and workplace standards across entire occupations, sectors, and industries.

Kate Andrias, David Madland, Malkie Wall

Workers’ Boards: Frequently Asked Questions Fact Sheet
The check-out line at a market in Delray Beach, Florida, February 2018. (People stand in a check-out line)

Workers’ Boards: Frequently Asked Questions

Workers’ boards—also known as wage boards or industry committees—set minimum wage rates, benefits, and workplace standards for an entire occupation, sector, or industry. Boards can raise wages for both low- and middle-income workers, and they are particularly helpful in industries where traditional collective bargaining is difficult.

Kate Andrias, David Madland, Malkie Wall

Show More